Tomato Comparison

I’ve been having a very hard time getting out to the garden recently and even less time to write up any new blog posts.  I’ve had this one in my mind for a while now, but never have seemed to have enough time or energy to write it up.

The topic of this post is the tomatoes and how different they all appear.  To help with this demonstration, I asked Ethan for his favorite Lego Minifig.  At that time, it was the Samukai.

Ethan's favorite Lego Minifig

Now that we have a frame of reference, let’s bring out the first tomato.  First up is the Sweet 100.  The single plant did ‘okay’ this year and the fruit was pretty tasty, but unfortunately this probably was the poorest year for this variety.  As you can see below, this variety is pretty small but for those of you that have tried them, they pack a nice sweet punch.

Lego Minifig versus the Sweet 100

Lego Minifig versus the Sweet 100

Next up in size is going to be the Large Cherry Tomato.  They tend to be about twice to three times the size of the Sweet 100.  I would venture to say that they also have about the same total amount of sweetness as the Sweet 100 just diluted to the larger size.  Still, they are a good tomato and are nice quartered and put in a salad or diced and used as a topping for tacos.

Lego versus Sweet 100 versus Large Cherry

Lego versus Sweet 100 versus Large Cherry

With that, we are done with the cherry variety and now moving on to the larger tomatoes.  Next up we have the Park’s Whopper.  Again, I don’t think it was that good of a tomato year because the winner of last year’s tomato race was less than stellar this year.  They did okay just not great.  Maybe only having a single plant held it back some.  Still the tomatoes I was able to get were nice looking and had a good flavor.

Adding Parks Whopper to the mix

Adding Parks Whopper to the mix

The final variety grown this year is the one I have been already writing about off and on during the season.  The heirloom Brandywine variety is the last to compare.  I have to say, these certainly are the largest tomatoes I have every grown (not that I have been growing tomatoes all that long).  The fruit from these plants are not only large, but very meaty as well.  Very little empty cavities when sliced open.  Interesting enough, they tend to have more of a pinky color to them as well but seem to finish reddening after being picked and brought into the house.  In the picture below, you can see how much larger they are.

The big Brandywine takes the stage

The big Brandywine takes the stage

Cross section of a Brandywine

Cross section of a Brandywine

For the fun of it, we decided to make a tomato stack as well.

Tomato stack

Tomato stack

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